Gawd, Jessie, this is really getting boring. How many more pictures are you gonna take?-historical background of police photography

historical background of police photography
historical background of police photography

Gawd, Jessie, this is really getting boring. How many more pictures are you gonna take?
(More details later, as time permits)

*************************************

After photographing some of the people and scenes on Camden High Street and Piccadilly Circus (which you can see in this Flickr set and this Flickr set), I decided that my next stop should be Trafalgar Square, which you can learn more about here on Wikipedia. Located in the center of London, the square is a public space and tourist attraction, and is also used for political demonstrations and community gatherings, such as the celebration of New Year’s Eve.

The name commemorates the 1805 Battle of Trafalgar, a major British naval victory during the Napoleonic Wars. The original name was to have been "King William the Fourth’s Square," but George Ledwell Taylor suggested the name "Trafalgar Square." In the 1820s the Prince Regent hired the architect John Nash to redevelop the area, and Nash cleared the square as part of his Charing Cross Improvement Scheme. The current architecture of the square is due to Sir Charles Barry and was completed in 1845.

Nelson’s Column is in the center of the square, flanked by fountains designed in 1937 as replacements for two earlier fountains, and guarded by four monumental bronze lions. The column is topped by a statue of Horatio Nelson, the vice admiral who commanded the British Fleet at Trafalgar. The square has become a social and political focus for visitors and Londoners alike; its symbolic importance was demonstrated in 1940 when the Nazi SS developed secret plans to transfer Nelson’s Column to Berlin following an expected German invasion

Since its construction, Trafalgar Square has been a popular spot for political demonstrations, though the authorities have often attempted to ban them. The same that year Nelson’s column opened, for example, the authorities started banning Chartist meetings in the square. A general ban on political rallies remained in effect until the 1880s, when the emerging Labour movement, particularly the Social Democratic Federation, began holding protests there.

One of the first significant demonstrations of the modern era was held in the square in September 1961 by the Committee of 100, which included the philosopher Bertrand Russell. The protesters rallied for peace and against war and nuclear weapons. The square was also scene to a large vigil held shortly after the terrorist bombings in London on July 7, 2005. On March 27, 2011, the square was occupied by protesters using the square to rally against the UK Budget and its proposed budget cuts. During the night, the situation turned violent as the escalation by riot police and protesters damaged major portions of the square.

With all of this historical background, I wasn’t quite sure what to expect when I got to Trafalgar Square. But it turned out to be mostly students and tourists from various countries, wandering around peacefully, as well as various "locals" who were enjoying a sunny afternoon in the square. I took some 200 photos, and decided that 40 of them were sufficiently interesting to warrant uploading to Flickr…

So that’s it for Trafalgar Square. Maybe I’ll come back someday, maybe I won’t. Meanwhile, there are still other places to see here in London — but they’ll have to wait for my next trip. For now, it’s time to head back to New York City.

historical background of police photography
historical background of police photography

You can’t take a picture of me that way – you’re pointing the camera at yourself!
(More details later, as time permits)

*************************************

After photographing some of the people and scenes on Camden High Street and Piccadilly Circus (which you can see in this Flickr set and this Flickr set), I decided that my next stop should be Trafalgar Square, which you can learn more about here on Wikipedia. Located in the center of London, the square is a public space and tourist attraction, and is also used for political demonstrations and community gatherings, such as the celebration of New Year’s Eve.

The name commemorates the 1805 Battle of Trafalgar, a major British naval victory during the Napoleonic Wars. The original name was to have been "King William the Fourth’s Square," but George Ledwell Taylor suggested the name "Trafalgar Square." In the 1820s the Prince Regent hired the architect John Nash to redevelop the area, and Nash cleared the square as part of his Charing Cross Improvement Scheme. The current architecture of the square is due to Sir Charles Barry and was completed in 1845.

Nelson’s Column is in the center of the square, flanked by fountains designed in 1937 as replacements for two earlier fountains, and guarded by four monumental bronze lions. The column is topped by a statue of Horatio Nelson, the vice admiral who commanded the British Fleet at Trafalgar. The square has become a social and political focus for visitors and Londoners alike; its symbolic importance was demonstrated in 1940 when the Nazi SS developed secret plans to transfer Nelson’s Column to Berlin following an expected German invasion

Since its construction, Trafalgar Square has been a popular spot for political demonstrations, though the authorities have often attempted to ban them. The same that year Nelson’s column opened, for example, the authorities started banning Chartist meetings in the square. A general ban on political rallies remained in effect until the 1880s, when the emerging Labour movement, particularly the Social Democratic Federation, began holding protests there.

One of the first significant demonstrations of the modern era was held in the square in September 1961 by the Committee of 100, which included the philosopher Bertrand Russell. The protesters rallied for peace and against war and nuclear weapons. The square was also scene to a large vigil held shortly after the terrorist bombings in London on July 7, 2005. On March 27, 2011, the square was occupied by protesters using the square to rally against the UK Budget and its proposed budget cuts. During the night, the situation turned violent as the escalation by riot police and protesters damaged major portions of the square.

With all of this historical background, I wasn’t quite sure what to expect when I got to Trafalgar Square. But it turned out to be mostly students and tourists from various countries, wandering around peacefully, as well as various "locals" who were enjoying a sunny afternoon in the square. I took some 200 photos, and decided that 40 of them were sufficiently interesting to warrant uploading to Flickr…

So that’s it for Trafalgar Square. Maybe I’ll come back someday, maybe I won’t. Meanwhile, there are still other places to see here in London — but they’ll have to wait for my next trip. For now, it’s time to head back to New York City.

historical background of police photography
historical background of police photography

Wait until all of my friends back home see how foolish these people look!
(More details later, as time permits)

*************************************

After photographing some of the people and scenes on Camden High Street and Piccadilly Circus (which you can see in this Flickr set and this Flickr set), I decided that my next stop should be Trafalgar Square, which you can learn more about here on Wikipedia. Located in the center of London, the square is a public space and tourist attraction, and is also used for political demonstrations and community gatherings, such as the celebration of New Year’s Eve.

The name commemorates the 1805 Battle of Trafalgar, a major British naval victory during the Napoleonic Wars. The original name was to have been "King William the Fourth’s Square," but George Ledwell Taylor suggested the name "Trafalgar Square." In the 1820s the Prince Regent hired the architect John Nash to redevelop the area, and Nash cleared the square as part of his Charing Cross Improvement Scheme. The current architecture of the square is due to Sir Charles Barry and was completed in 1845.

Nelson’s Column is in the center of the square, flanked by fountains designed in 1937 as replacements for two earlier fountains, and guarded by four monumental bronze lions. The column is topped by a statue of Horatio Nelson, the vice admiral who commanded the British Fleet at Trafalgar. The square has become a social and political focus for visitors and Londoners alike; its symbolic importance was demonstrated in 1940 when the Nazi SS developed secret plans to transfer Nelson’s Column to Berlin following an expected German invasion

Since its construction, Trafalgar Square has been a popular spot for political demonstrations, though the authorities have often attempted to ban them. The same that year Nelson’s column opened, for example, the authorities started banning Chartist meetings in the square. A general ban on political rallies remained in effect until the 1880s, when the emerging Labour movement, particularly the Social Democratic Federation, began holding protests there.

One of the first significant demonstrations of the modern era was held in the square in September 1961 by the Committee of 100, which included the philosopher Bertrand Russell. The protesters rallied for peace and against war and nuclear weapons. The square was also scene to a large vigil held shortly after the terrorist bombings in London on July 7, 2005. On March 27, 2011, the square was occupied by protesters using the square to rally against the UK Budget and its proposed budget cuts. During the night, the situation turned violent as the escalation by riot police and protesters damaged major portions of the square.

With all of this historical background, I wasn’t quite sure what to expect when I got to Trafalgar Square. But it turned out to be mostly students and tourists from various countries, wandering around peacefully, as well as various "locals" who were enjoying a sunny afternoon in the square. I took some 200 photos, and decided that 40 of them were sufficiently interesting to warrant uploading to Flickr…

So that’s it for Trafalgar Square. Maybe I’ll come back someday, maybe I won’t. Meanwhile, there are still other places to see here in London — but they’ll have to wait for my next trip. For now, it’s time to head back to New York City.

historical background of police photography

%d bloggers like this: