MG Gundam Exia

MG
MG

MG Gundam Exia
The much anticipated MG Exia finally arrives, and it is certainly a treat. Boasting superior proportions and detail, the Master Grade model soars over its predecessors. However, it is not perfect:

1. The neck is single jointed, which means inferior neck articulation compared with previous MGs
2. The shoulders don’t quite swing out as much as I’d have hoped. It is definitely inferior to the Zaku II 2.0 kits, and being a sword-slinging suit, the shoulders are the key to recreating some of the more dynamic poses
3. Though the non-part-swapping gimmick for the leg sword mounts are cool, they are ultimately faulty when it comes to dynamic poses as the angle of operation is very limited for the small hidden ball joints that lie within the hip joints.

Other than those points, it’s a splendid model. It looks fantastic in action, despite the limitations, and of course, it looks sublime in a standing pose.

For a full review on the Master Grade Gundam Exia from Gundam 00, check out my post on Hobby Hovel!

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MG

MG TA
The MG TA replaced the PB in 1936. It was an evolution of the previous car and was 3 inches (76 mm) wider in its track at 45 inches (1,100 mm) and 7 inches (180 mm) longer in its wheelbase at 94 inches (2,400 mm). The previous advanced overhead cam engine was now not in use by any other production car so it was replaced by a more typical MPJG OHV unit from the Wolseley 10 but with twin SU carburettors, modified camshaft and manifolding. The engine displaced just 1292 cc, with a stroke of 102 mm (4.0 in) and a bore of 63.5 mm (2.5 in) and power output was 50 hp (40.3 kW) at 4,500 rpm. The four speed manual gearbox now had synchromesh on the two top ratios. Like the PB, most were two seat open cars with a steel body on an ash frame but it could also be had from 1938 as a Tickford drophead coupé with body by Salmsons of Newport Pagnell or closed "airline" coupé as fitted to the P type but only one of these is thought to have been made. It was capable of reaching nearly 80 mph (130 km/h) in standard tune with a 0–60 mph time of 23.1 seconds. Unlike the PB, hydraulic brakes were fitted. Just over 3,000 were made and in 1936 it cost £222 on the home market.

MG
MG

mg overpriced xpower
mg the expensive waste of space as far as i am concerned £70,000 car by a company that went bankrupt what management were thinking with this i have no idea .at the British motoring heritage museum gaydon .

MG

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