Anonymous – Self-portrait in convex mirror (1919) – In The New History of Photography-history of photography

history of photography
history of photography

Anonymous – Self-portrait in convex mirror (1919) – In The New History of Photography

history of photography
history of photography

[ E ] Frederick Henry Evans – Aubrey Beardsley (1895)
"Frederick Evans first encountered Aubrey Beardsley around 1890. Beardsley, who was then a clerk in London’s Guardian Insurance Company on Lombard Street, would spend his lunch hour browsing Evans’s bookshop in Cheapside. Undiscovered as an artist, Beardsley would occasionally barter his drawings for books in Evans’s shop. Of the present portrait, Evans wrote, ‘One of my earliest attempts, and perhaps successes, was [my portrait] of . . . Aubrey Beardsley, the well-known artist who died so young. . . His wonderful hands fascinated me. I well
remember, on the morning I was working at him, saying that I verily believed he could pose as La Stryge of
Meryon’s extraordinary etching, so ‘gargoyleish’ did he sometimes look. At the word, he framed his wonderful profile in his long, bony, sensitive, nervous-looking hands, with their beautifully shaped and delicately kept nails. There at once was my study, and a study any artist would be in ecstacies to have drawn or painted’ (Photography, Christmas Number, 1903, p. 6).

"Beaumont Newhall was an early champion of the work of Frederick Evans. He first saw original Evans photographs in London in 1944, in a memorial exhibition organized by the Royal Photographic Society. Struck by the artistry and richness of the platinum prints, he reproduced two works by Evans in later editions of his History of Photography, including the image offered here. In 1964, Newhall mounted a retrospective of Evans’s work at the George Eastman House, the first such show in the United States. The monograph Newhall authored for that exhibition was later reprinted by Aperture, with an expanded selection of plates, to accompany the 1975 Frederick Evans show
presented at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Newhall’s monograph remained the standard work on Evans for the
next five decades."

history of photography

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